The Fundamentals of Fr. T. Dajczer’s ideas in theology and religious sciences

A genius of the theologian of faith and disposition

Father Tadeusz Dajczer was „deeply rooted in the rich and long experience of the faith of the Church”[1]. He kept developing reflection on theological life – the life of faith, hope and charity.[2] “The way of faith is outlined by three stages: 1. the Lord invites us to share God’s life (…). 2. Faith is a dynamic power (…) 3. This dynamism requires strong sustenance which is the Eucharist, God’s word, the prayer of the heart.”[3] “The way of faith is outlined by three stages: 1. the Lord invites us to share God’s life (…). 2. Faith is a dynamic power (…) 3. This dynamism requires strong sustenance which is the Eucharist, God’s word, the prayer of the heart.”[4]. Faith develops. Hope “is being born from the encounter with God and is the fruit of experiencing him.”[5]. Father Zbigniew Krzyszowski from the Institute of Fundamental Theology of the John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin does not hesitate to speak about the genius of the theologian of faith in the case of Fr. Dajczer.[6] “The grace needs openness and interior disposition.”[7] Faith is readiness of receiving the redemptive graces.[8] “All the sacraments of the Church need faith as disposition.”[9] “Faith is a process and above all a relation between two persons: God who gives the grace and man who can receive this grace, but can also reject it, close himself to it. The grace of faith and the disposition of man always touch each other.”[10] Father Dajczer dealt particularly with the issue of man’s disposition to receiving graces flowing from the sacrament of the Eucharist.[11]


Originality of Christianity in comparison with other religions[12]

The considerable part of Fr. Dajczer’s thought on the religious sciences concerns the credibility of Christianity, entering in this way the field of fundamental theology.[13]

Originality of Christianity compared to Buddhism

A point of departure in Buddhism is found in experience, while in Christianity in Revelation.[14] Buddhism stresses personal quests of an individual which play secondary role in Christianity focused on receiving and keeping the Revelation, emphasizing God’s initiative.[15] Buddhism has an anthropocentric character, whereas Christianity – a theocentric one. In Buddhism, as opposed to Christianity, one can speak of autosoterism (selfredemption).[16]

The idea of Christian conversion constitutes a radical novelty and remains in contrast to Buddhist syncretism.[17]

In Buddhism there occur cosmic sources of morality; it is a cosmocentric religion. The source of morality in Christianity is the Revelation. This creates a huge chasm between these religions in the realm of motivation as well as the content of moral imperatives. In Buddhism there is no equivalent of the Christian notion of sin.[18]

“In contrast to Christianity the notion of God in the actual sense as the transcendent Creator and the Redeemer of the world does not exist in Buddhism. Opposite to Christianity, the redemption in its actual sense as the work of God through the grace does not exist either; there is only a liberation (from suffering) accomplished individually in the autosoteric (selfredemptive) sense. In contrast to Christianity, in Buddhism there is no faith in the accurate sense as the reply to God’s revelation in history. In contrast to Christianity, there exists no universal and active love until sacrificing life on the cross, but instead the universal compassion and cheerful kindliness heading towards the enlightenment. In contrast to Christianity, there exists in Buddhism no individual and separate entity nor the notion of spiritual communion with God and other people.”[19]


[1] Wilfrid Stinissen OCD, Foreword to the Norwegian edition of Inquiring Faith [Forord], [in:] Betraktninger over troen, Maximilian Kolbe Utgivelser, Oslo 2000, p.3. Cf. http://dajczer.eu/eng/boox_row.html
[2] Cf. Rev. Zbigniew Krzyszowski, Dajczer Tadeusz, [in:] Rev. Marian Rusecki et al. ed., The Lexicon of Fundamental Theology [Leksykon teologii fundamentalnej], Lublin – Kraków 2002, p.299-300.
[3] Cf. René Laurentin, Foreword to the French edition [Préface], [in:] Tadeusz Dajczer, Méditations sur la foi, Fraçois-Xavier de Guibert, Paris 2006, p.9-10.
[4] Cf. Rev. Zbigniew Krzyszowski, Dajczer Tadeusz, op.cit., p.299-300.
[5] Ibid.
[6] Ibid.
[7] Fr. Tadeusz Dajczer, Inquiring Faith [Rozważania o wierze], Częstochowa 1998, p.195.
[8] Cf. Fr. Tadeusz Dajczer, The Sacrament of Presence [Sakrament obecności], Opole – Warszawa 2009, p.114.
[9] Cf. Fr. Tadeusz Dajczer, By the Power of Faith [Mocą wiary], Zamość – Warszawa 2009, p.10.
[10] Cf. Fr. Tadeusz Dajczer, By the Power of Faith [Mocą wiary], op.cit., p.11.
[11] Cf. Stanisław Card. Dziwisz, Foreword [Przedmowa], [in:] The Mystery of Faith [Tajemnica wiary], Warszawa 2007, p.v
[12] Cf. Rev. Tadeusz Dajczer, Originality of a Christian Against the Background of Other Religions [Oryginalność chrześcijanina na tle innych religii], Catholic review [Przegląd Katolicki], 1986, 40, 2.
[13] Cf. Rev. Zbigniew Krzyszowski, Dajczer Tadeusz, op.cit., p.299-300.
[14] Cf. Rev. Tadeusz Dajczer, Buddhism in its Specificity and Difference to Christianity [Buddyzm w swej specyfice i odrębności wobec chrześcijaństwa], Warszawa 1993, p.356.
[15] Ibid.
[16] Cf. Rev. Tadeusz Dajczer, Buddhism…, op. cit., p.364.
[17] Cf. Rev. Tadeusz Dajczer, Buddhism…, op. cit., p.358.
[18] Cf. Rev. Tadeusz Dajczer, Buddhism…, op. cit., p.360.
[19] Rev. Tadeusz Dajczer, Buddhism…, op. cit., p.366.

search the website dajczer.eu